Defining “affordable”

Only a few people know that I live in “affordable housing.” It’s not something that I want to publicize because of the stigma involved. One friend recently asked me what my rent is, and was shocked at the answer.

That’s because it’s not all that “affordable.”

And it’s about to get worse.

There are different types of “affordable housing.” The kind I live in works like this:

  • I live in an apartment complex.
  • At least 10% of the units need to be part of the “affordable housing” program so that the developers/owners get tax breaks.
  • The rents are set by the state, based on my region. It’s based on a percentage of local earnings or housing rates or something. I’m not sure, and it doesn’t really matter, because it works out the same way.
  • Every year, the state determines how much rents will go up in my region.

As my lease is coming up for renewal, I filled out the 25-page questionnaire that reminded me of the colonoscopy I once had. They need A LOT of information. I have to account for every deposit into my bank account so they know my income is within the affordable housing limits. Cash a check from my parents? That counts as income. Get a job? That counts as income. Sell shit from my apartment? That counts as income. It’s invasive and unpleasant, but I do it so I can live here.

When they gave me the form, I was also told when next year’s rent will be. It’s a lot. Cheaper than what my neighbors in this complex pay, but a lot. Over $1400, not including utilities. Now I live in the Boston area, so rents here are high. Still, this is tough for someone who isn’t able to work full time. (Actually, my income is below their minimum requirements. The only let me move in because I have enough money in savings so assure I can cover my rent. Sadly, a lot of people earn too little to qualify for “affordable” housing!)

The increase bugs the hell out of me for one simple reason: it is a 5% increase! Yes, my rent is low compared to my neighbors, but 5%!

Rents in the area have been skyrocketing for years. My social security disability payments will not go up at all this year. I get the maximum SNAP (formerly food stamps) benefits, and this year they went down by $2 per month because the maximum amount was lowered. None of my other benefits are going up. And let’s say I was working. I might be lucky enough to get a 2-3% raise. Maybe, and I mean maybe, a 4% raise. Maybe. But no one gets a 5% raise.

The cost of food is going up. Housing costs are going up. And benefits are going down. Politicians are saying that these programs cost too much, and they’re right. But instead of finding a way to fund the programs or fix the system, they are reducing benefits to people who need them.

And I am one of the lucky ones. I have enough money in savings to cover my costs for a while. My part time work covers some of my expenses. My parents help out a bit. It all works out. Sure, I almost never get to spend money on fun things, but at least I’m getting by.

I was telling someone that the waiting list for Section 8 housing is now 8-10 years. I am told I should expect to wait another 3-4 years to get into the program. Of course, I was told that when I signed up 4 years ago. She asked what people are supposed to do in the meantime.

And that’s the catch. The “safety nets” only work for people who aren’t truly desperate for them. Yes, people who are homeless get moved up on the waiting list for Section 8 (which is one reason why I get pushed down the list.) But it’s not enough. Someone shouldn’t have to be homeless before they get help.

These things are decided by people with good jobs earning steady paychecks. They presumably can pay for housing and food from those paychecks. So maybe they simply don’t understand what “affordable” means? I’d rather think they don’t get it, than that they don’t care.

Because raising rents based on what the community is earning or paying might sound good in theory. But a 5% rent increase is a lot for someone who wasn’t making ends meet before, and isn’t getting any sort of increase in their own income.

And I’m one of the lucky ones. What does that say about our system?

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3 Responses to Defining “affordable”

  1. I believe that many here in the UK would say it is much the same – when affordable housing in London is based on average prices, then it is not affordable for the average person….so whose definition of affordable are we using? The wealthy who buy properties that then lay empty in the case of London, or the NHS and teaching staff who can’t afford to live in the city/town that they work in, Crazy!!

    • chronicrants says:

      I’ve heard that housing in London feels impossible to a lot of people. That must be so difficult, when even the people with jobs who provide services can’t afford a place to live. How would a disabled person who can’t work manage it? So frustrating!

  2. Just wanted to let you know that I’ve included your post link on PainPals regular feature Monday Magic – Inspiring Blogs for You! Claire x

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