What would it look like if healthcare worked the way I wanted it to?

I write a lot about all of the small things that I think are wrong with the system and the many small improvements I’d like to see. Those are all fine on a small scale, but what about the big picture? I decided to mentally design my own fictional healthcare system. For this my 500th (!!) post, I’m laying out just a few ideas for a system that I would 1-19-2015 5-44-01 PMactually want to be a part of. But I want your input to help make this fictional system even better! So please add your own ideas in the comments!

Now, I know that none if this is realistic right now politically, but wouldn’t it be nice if……?

To start, Ms. Rants’ Healthcare System (MRHS) is a system that would put the patient first. The goal would be to maintain health and prevent illness. Let’s say that again, because that’s a big fucking deal, and something that most of us don’t experience right now.

The system would put the patient first.

The goal would be to maintain health and prevent illness.

Oh my, I’m already light-headed with excitement! Ok, so we have our goal in place. Next up, let’s make sure everyone can access it, and I do mean everyone. Sure, someone has to pay for this, but I’m thinking there would either be a sliding scale or it would be paid for through taxes. But every person would have access to MRHS, regardless of income, assets, health, sexual orientation, gender identity, race, religion, citizenship status, etc.

And since we’re talking about access, that means that every office would have the following:

  • Accessible doors, chairs, bathrooms, examining tables, and everything else for all (including those who are able-bodied, in a wheelchair, overweight, blind, etc.)
  • Well-trained staff to understand and assist with the above.
  • Translators. The MRHS would have a staff of translators all over the world, all accessible via online video. When needed, translators would also be available in person whenever possible. All documents would be available in any language needed by the patient.
  • Medical personnel available for home visits for those patients who are unable to leave their homes.
  • Appointments in the morning, afternoon, and evening as well as weekend appointments. For the rare time the office is closed, patients can go to their local hospital for no charge.
  • Reserved appointment times for those who need last minute appointments not only for emergencies, but because they can not schedule in advance. For example, a retail worker may not know their work schedule until a few days in advance, so they need the flexibility to move appointments.

Of course, MRHS would also provide transportation to appointments for those who need it.

Now let’s talk about medical records. These would be electronic and available to every medical professional in every practice. I have spoken to programmer friends who work on these kinds of things so I know it’s not realistic right now, but this is my dream, and I’m choosing to dream about a world where this is possible. Right now, my Beth Israel hospital records can’t be read by my doctor at Brigham & Women’s Hospital unless I print them out and carry them with me. In MRHS, though, every doctor would use the same system. Everyone would be connected. But it wouldn’t only be the doctors who were connected: the patient would also be connected! The patient (or in the case of a child, the patient’s guardian) would approve each doctor who would see their record, and could rescind that permission at any time. The patient would also be able to make notes in their record, pointing out discrepancies between what they said/feel/experienced and what the doctor wrote. Of course, for this to work, every patient would need internet access and a computer, but of course in the MRHS dream that’s the reality, so that each patient can also participate in online support groups and do their own medical research. Training to use the computer would also be provided.

Of course, since each patient is being given the opportunity to be an active participant in their own care, the notes they add to their electronic record will be read and responded to in a timely manner. Patients can email every doctor, nurse, physician’s assistant, and other medical professional. Patients can also enter requests for certain tests and explain their reasoning as well as request changes in medications. Medical professionals will not receive any incentives or disincentives regarding tests or treatments, so all tests will be ordered unless there is a reason not to, and all treatments will be chosen based on their likelihood of success for the patient.

All tests and medications will be covered 100% by MRHS, of course. In addition, any over-the-counter item prescribed by a doctor will also be covered. For example, the multivitamins and vitamin D that my doctors now want me to take would be covered.

And it should go without saying that all accredited medical professionals will be covered. That includes doctors of all specialties, naturopaths, acupuncturists, chiropractors, and every other medical professional. If they’ve successfully completed their training, registered, and haven’t done anything really wrong, they’ll be covered. Simple.

Now, we haven’t touched yet on what it means for a medical professional to complete their training. You see, the MRHS has a different set of criteria for medical professionals than the current systems. Each medical professional will have to go through schooling and then follow up with continuing education, as they do now in many systems, but the content of that training will be different. Yes, they will be taught biology, etc. But first they will be taught to respect patients. They will consider a patient’s experience and intuition. They will learn not to dismiss a patient’s reported symptoms simply because they are unlikely or unusual. They will spend time overnight in hospitals, being treated as if they are ill, being taken care of and woken up for tests, etc. They will experience waiting rooms. They will go to offices and sit in waiting rooms, then report their symptoms to a strange person and see what they say. Nothing can replicate the pain, fear, and uncertainty that many patients face, but it’s a start.

They will focus not only on curing illness, but on maintaining health.

They will be trained to treat all patients equally, eliminating all racism, sexism, homophobia, biphobia, transphobia, anti-semitism, islamophobia…. and all other prejudices. They will be taught how to truly listen to patients. Medical professionals across specialties will team up when necessary. A rheumatologist, neurologist, and naturopath might all consult with one another about a particular patient or about a series of patients who seem to cross their specialties. Medical professionals will never lie to patients, even if they think it is in the patient’s “best interest.” They will offer patients all potential testing and treatment options and will guide but never decide for the patient. They will take their time with each patient and be sure the patient fully understands everything and that all questions are answered.

In short, they will learn to put the patient and the patient’s health first.

In the MRHS system, pharmaceutical companies will have no direct contact with medical professionals. Instead, a web site will be regularly updated. It will list every medication. New medications will be marked as new. It will include study results, including effectiveness and side effects. It will include comments by prescribers. When prescribers have questions about a medication, they will post their question to a message board on the site. Other prescribers will answer. Pharma reps can also answer, but their screen names will show they are pharma reps. There will be no more “conferences” for specific medications paid for by the pharma companies. Instead, medications will only be discussed at medical conferences. Pharma companies won’t attend these conferences. Prescribers will present on medications just like they present on medical equipment and other treatments, studies, observations of patients, etc. They will not be paid for this in cash, meals, or any other compensation.

I know this doesn’t cover everything, but isn’t it a fantastic beginning? I would love to be a patient in this system!

I realize that at some point my perspective changed. I started this article by writing about what “would” happen, and at some point “would” changed to “will.” Normally I would go back and change that so that it’s consistent, but I like it the way it is. Right now MRHS is a dream, but I’d like us all to start thinking about it as a potential reality. If we don’t dream big, it will never happen. I’d rather dream big.

Ok, your turn: what would you change about MRHS? What did I miss? Please add your thoughts in the comments! Let’s see just how great we can make this!

And on a side note, thanks so much for sticking with me. I can’t believe this is my 500th post! How did that happen?

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6 Responses to What would it look like if healthcare worked the way I wanted it to?

  1. Karen J says:

    WooHoo! for number 500!!
    “How did that happen?” That’s easy ~ One post at time 🙂

    I love the MRHS – will have to let “what would you add” marinate a while, though. Can’t wait to see what else is suggested!

  2. Lorna says:

    First thing I saw was 500th post! So big congrats on writing that many posts!
    I will read and digest and comment in a bit or a long bit
    Hugs xx

  3. Lorna says:

    Here in the UK our NHS is free for anyone to see a Dr, nurse or consultant and to stay in hospital. Our records are accessible to all with your consent.Most people pay for drugs which is set at£8.00 an item. I pay £104 a year pre pay for all my drugs!
    I would definitely attend MRHS, I would like to have the continuity of seeing the same team for my chronic health. Perhaps there could be a special unit for chronic illness. Having different Drs onboard seeing you they might not miss illnesses!
    It was interesting to hear about the pharma companies. They don’t have a say in the UK. Drugs are made then it is up to the NHS if they can afford them. It would be good to be able to have an drug despite its price.
    For you in the US I pray that things will change so healthcare is accessible for all.
    On another topic, have you any ideas what to do for a tummy that is gnawing and all my tablets irritate it to the point of pain. They have put me on lansoprazole a high dose and I think it’s working but then I got put on antibiotics and it’s back.
    Thanks
    Take care, hugs xx

  4. chronicrants says:

    Lorna, I like your idea of a chronic health care team! It sounds like the NHS system is better in some ways than ours and worse in others.

    I’m sorry to hear about your stomach issues! I wish I had some useful advice to offer. It turns out that my problems were all from undiagnosed Celiac and leaky gut, so dietary changes fixed it. But since I don’t know your situation, I have no clue if the source of your problems could be the same or not. But if your doctors aren’t fixing the problem, then you should probably get another opinion from someone new. Good luck!

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