Foiled by my supposed medication

September 23, 2020

For a short time, I thought I had finally fixed my sleep problems. And I had. Until it all went to hell.

My entire life I have been wide awake at night. It didn’t matter how tired I was, I would suddenly be awake. Mornings were horrible. I remember my mother’s struggles to get me out of bed from a young age. There were years of snoozing the alarm, and the ensuing difficulty getting to school or work. I never understood how people manage to do anything before work in the mornings. Go to the gym? Wash dishes? Clean? Read? It was all I could do to get on clothes, eat something, and get out the door.

When I developed sleep apnea, I began seeing a sleep specialist. In addition to treating the sleep apnea, he figured out that this problem of mine was due to a circadian rhythm shift. There’s nothing wrong with this as far as the body is concerned. It is only a problem because we live in a 9-5 world. What to do about it? He had me use a blue sunlamp for a short time in the mornings. That definitely helped me to feel more alert in the mornings. (And as a bonus, I am now much less bitchy when my seasonal affective disorder kicks in every fall and winter.) Still, I was sleep-deprived because I wasn’t going to bed at a reasonable hour. I wanted to, but I was too awake.

This worked so well. I wish they still made it!

Then the doctor introduced melatonin. Most stores sold 3mg tablets or more. He had me start much smaller. He recommended a site that sold 0.3 mg tablets. I took that it knocked me out, but I had a hangover effect in the morning. I cut it in half. That was better, but I was still tired in the morning. I cut it into quarters. Ah, much better. It took a lot of trial and error, but finally I found the right dose and the right timing. If I was out then I had to skip it (which always led to too little sleep) but most nights I was home, and I took my 75mcg melatonin every night. It wasn’t perfect, but it helped a lot.

Then I started taking hydrocortisone for my adrenal fatigue. I had also recently figured out that a few of my supplements were making me sick from corn derivatives in their ingredients. Fixing these things, combined with my new sleep routine, felt nothing short of miraculous. For the first time in my life, I was sleeping! I went to sleep at a decent hour, slept with my ASV (a form of CPAP machine) and woke up feeling rested. It was a miracle! Yes, I still had chronic fatigue, yes, I still had pain and all sorts of other symptoms, but at least I didn’t wake up feeling more tired than when I went to bed. And in general, my health was much better. It was amazing!

Sadly, that only lasted a few months. I noticed I was running low on my melatonin so I went online to reorder it, and found that the company had gone out of business! I was so disappointed. This had been working so well! My doctor didn’t have any suggestions, so I went online. Finally, I found a liquid melatonin that was gluten-free and corn-free. The dose was too high, but I hoped that a single drop, instead of a dropper-full, would be ok.

I took one drop and it was too much. I diluted it with water, making a 1:1 ratio. Nope, still a hangover in the morning. So I did a 2:1. I felt better in the morning, but still hungover. Meanwhile, it wasn’t doing such a great job of making me sleepy at night. Huh. That wasn’t right.

I struggled for 7 loooooong months. I tried different amounts. I tried different times. I thought maybe something about my body had changed. Or maybe it was the stress of the pandemic (even though I started it before the pandemic and had troubles even then.) I still had a few of the old pills. I had saved them, thinking it would be easier to take them with me on trips instead of the liquid (this was just before the pandemic, when still I expected to do some travel.) I took those 1/4 tablets for a few days and felt so much better. I went to sleep earlier, woke up feeling alert, and had more energy all day long. I took the liquid again and stayed up too late, woke up sleepy, and had less energy all day. What the…..?

This should be labeled as slow-release! This hurt me so much and I didn’t know why until yesterday.

It made no sense. They’re both melatonin, right? Finally, last week, I had an epiphany: what if this is a slow-release? The assumption for all medications (or so I thought) is that they are immediate-release unless they say otherwise. In fact, many melatonin products are specifically labeled as being slow release. I looked up the old melatonin and yes, it was immediate-release. I checked the new one and it didn’t say anything on the label. Yesterday I called the company and got my answer: it is slow-release. Holy crap!

This means that for 7 months, I have been struggling, feeling worse, because my supposed medication is slow-release and wasn’t labeled as such. I was pissed! I still am, but I’ve calmed down a bit. Sort of. Ok, not really. This is inexcusable!

Now the search begins again. Yesterday I started a spreadsheet. I am scouring the web, checking all forms of melatonin. No one else makes anything less than 1mg, so I need to get a liquid form that I can dilute. It has to be gluten-free and corn-free. It has to be immediate release. I will pay anything, but I must find this unicorn of melatonin products. Because damn it, I want my sleep, my alertness, my energy back!

If you happen to know of a gluten-free, corn-free, low dose, immediate release version of melatonin, please let me know and I will be forever grateful.

Meanwhile, if anyone needs me, I’ll be at my computer, spending hours researching a product that I should have had last winter, if only the one I bought had been properly labeled.


Will today be the day to go outside?

November 20, 2018

On the one hand, I knew that going out 2 nights in a row might be too much. On the other hand, I thought I might be ready for it. And how would I know if I didn’t try? So I tried. And it could have worked. Could have, but didn’t.

Now, it’s not like I was out clubbing until 2am both nights. The first night I went to play board games, and got home just before 10pm. That would have been fine, except because I was out, I didn’t take my melatonin, and so I felt too awake to sleep. I ended up going to bed at 1am and only sleeping 6 hours. Yikes!

The next day I rested all day, then pushed myself to go out at night. I recently began volunteering for an organization I really care about. I do small things from home and attend meetings once a month. So far, I had only been able to attend by phone, but it was important to me to attend in person. So I went. I was tired, but once I was there I felt good! Still, I hadn’t finished the dinner I brought with me, and the small appetite should have been my warning. I got home before 10pm, but slept badly.

I knew I was pushing my limits. During the meeting I would occasionally cough. Just one little cough every 10 minutes or so, not the kind you get when you have a cold, but the kind that means I’m not breathing well. That’s because my lack of sleep the night before meant I hadn’t used my CPAP enough. After a second night of poor sleep, my sleep apnea was really causing problems. I woke up the next day feeling really blah. Was it my regular autoimmune stuff? Was I coming down with a cold? Was my autoimmune stuff preventing me from fighting off a cold? Only time would tell. I did the smart but boring thing – I stayed home all day to rest. So much for the errands I wanted to run and things I wanted to do around the house.

The next day I clearly had a small cold. Damn. I canceled my date and stayed in. Again. More tv. I wished I was reading a novel instead of an interesting-but-too-much-brain-power-required nonfiction book. I felt sort of queasy after eating, but not in the usual way, or in a really sick way. More in a my-body-is-trying-to-do-too-much way. Weird.

The next day I still had a cold and was still having mixed results with food. Time for more rest!

And each night I was sleeping badly. I was congested from the cold, so I kept having to take off my CPAP mask during the night. You know what’s worse than not sleeping? Sleeping without my CPAP. It’s true. I’d be better off staying awake. Too bad I didn’t. The exhaustion was crushing.

Still, after 3 days at home I was feeling better. The cold seemed to have cleared up much faster than usual. I took a short walk! I washed my hair! I put the pajamas and towels from the last few days in the laundry! I wanted to run errands, but figured I should rest. Instead, I cooked a nice but relatively easy dinner. I was on the mend!

Except after dinner I felt a bit queasy. And by 8:30pm I was falling asleep on the couch. I slept on the couch without my CPAP for half and hour (d’oh!) and then went to bed, where I watched a movie on my phone for an hour and a half. Finally I was able to sleep. And for once, I shut off my phone. The new Android update makes it hard to shut off all sounds, and too often a ding or a ring comes through, so I shut it off completely. Then I slept with my CPAP for over 10 hours! I can’t remember the last time I did that. 9 is a lot, but 10!? Unheard of for me.

I woke up feeling somewhat rested. But still tired. Still run down. I didn’t get out of my pajamas all day. At one point I was going to. I took off my bathrobe. Then decided changing clothes was overrated and went back to watching tv.

In the past 5 days I have crocheted a bunch of stuff, finished the book I was reading, and watched a ton of tv. I haven’t gone grocery shopping, gotten a haircut, brought in my phone to be fixed (there’s a problem with texting that really needs to be addressed), booked an AirBnb for an upcoming trip (I’ll get to that in another post), or done a bunch of other stuff that really needs to be done. I WANT to do all of that, but I just haven’t felt up to it.

And then today I woke up feeling…. normal? Normal-ish? I don’t know, but I definitely feel more like myself. I’m tempted to try going to the grocery store. I really need food. And I especially need the food I promised to make for Thanksgiving.

But I haven’t left the house other than that short walk since Wednesday. Today is Tuesday. And someone is dropping their dog off tonight for several days of dog sitting. She’s a darling and fairly easy, but I’ll need to walk her before bed and again first thing in the morning. I should probably save my energy for that. I want to go outside. I really do. The snow is pretty and the fresh air would be lovely. But on the other hand, I’m still a bit tired, so maybe getting out of pajamas and taking a shower will be enough activity for today.

My friends get a cold and they push through, continuing to care for kids and pets, going to work, running errands. I wish they would stay home so they didn’t spread their germs. I’m the opposite: I got a cold so I stayed in and kept my germs to myself, then had to deal with the autoimmune fallout and was stuck at home for another 3 days – and counting! It’s just one more of the countless frustrations that come with chronic illness.


Watching dawn

April 19, 2018

The first time it happened, I was baffled. Waking up during the night isn’t so unusual, but staying awake for hours before falling asleep again is beyond odd.

It happened a bunch of times, but finally I got into a good sleep pattern. Between my CPAP for sleep apnea, various supplements, good bedtime routines, etc., I was doing ok as far as sleep went. Not fantastic, but ok.

Until a couple weeks ago. At least 5 times in the last 2 weeks I have woken up during the night and stayed awake for a while. Sometimes I have thoughts swirling in my head. Sometimes I feel like I can’t breath with my CPAP on. Sometimes I’m in pain. But always, I’m awake. Too awake.

This morning, not for the first time, I saw dawn break. I’m not a morning person, and I have only ever voluntarily seen dawn 3 times in my life: once because I knew it would be beautiful to see dawn over the Atlantic ocean where I was staying and so I woke up super early to see it, once on an airplane where the time difference made it easy, and once when some friends and I stayed up all night talking and laughing and watching movies (ah, youth) only to discover as we finally turned out the lights that it was actually getting light outside already. That’s it. The rest of the times have been far from voluntary.

Like this morning.

Last night went something like this:

  • Wake up.
  • Realize something isn’t right.
  • Look at the clock.
  • Look at the readout on my CPAP and realize I only wore the mask for an hour even though I had slept for 3.
  • Put on CPAP mask.
  • Try to shut off the thoughts running through my head. I’m not stressed out, just too awake to stop thinking.
  • Try to sleep.
  • Finally give up on sleep.
  • Go to the bathroom.
  • Drink water.
  • Try to sleep.
  • Can’t sleep.
  • Read a book for a while.
  • See that it’s getting light out.
  • Feel sleepy.
  • Notice that it’s 6am.
  • Debate staying awake for the day at this point.
  • Remember that I have only slept for about 3 hours, and only 1 hour with the CPAP.
  • Put on the mask and go back to sleep.
  • Wake up to a loud noise and feel tired and irritated. Why didn’t I shut off the alarm when I was awake during the night?
  • Snooze the alarm.
  • Sleep for a few more minutes, then give up and stay awake. At least I got to sleep for another 2 hours.

That was bad. Even worse was trying to focus today. I didn’t get out of bed until 10am. I was awake, but dragging. When I got up, the world had started the day without me. People kept texting me. I responded, until I just couldn’t manage it anymore. A friend was trying to figure out where we should meet up the next day, but I couldn’t handle making decisions. It was hard to focus. Wait, did I say that already? Everything was a bit tough to grasp. Everything was exhausting.

A friend suggested I call a doctor, but who? I saw my sleep doctor recently. There’s nothing more to be done. I have a complicated condition that’s hard to treat, and they’re doing the best they can. There’s a medication that could help. One. And it’s in a class of drugs that I’m allergic to. I take supplements that help, but not consistently. Medical marijuana helps, but I don’t want to use that every single night. So I just have to try and stick it out. It sucks.

Now it’s night again, and almost time for bed. Tomorrow night I’m going to a show that I have been looking forward to for months. I have the ticket. I have plans to go with a friend. So please please please I just need to sleep through the night with my CPAP mask on all night long. Please. If I do that, I know I’ll be able to function.

If only I had a choice.


How a weekend away is a 2 week ordeal

October 2, 2017

I’m going away this weekend and I’m super excited!

I used to travel all the time. 2 months at home felt like FOREVER. I could pack an overnight back without even thinking about it. I got on a plane multiple times each year and did some weeks and weekends within driving distance. A weekend away in the Berkshires, less than a 3 hour drive away, would be no big deal.

But that was then.

And this is now.

Now I have to plan. I am being super careful about washing my hands and avoiding germs. I can’t get sick now!

I need to bring food with me. I will be with friends and some food will be safe for me to eat, but I need to bring other food. So I went to the grocery store today (Monday) and carefully planned out what I will make and which days I will make it. I also promised to bake cookies to bring, and I can’t do big cooking on the same day I bake, because I won’t have enough energy for that, but I can’t make anything too far in advance because I want it all to be fresh.

The day before the trip I will do some packing, but most of my stuff (my ASV (which is like a CPAP), my medications, toiletries, and more) can’t be packed until the day of. I need to ration my energy that day. Thankfully, I only have to drive half an hour to a friends’ house that day and then she will do the rest of the driving from there. Still, even being a passenger will be tiring and painful.

I am already thinking about how to handle my food and medications on the day of the trip. I always feel like shit the first night I travel. So I am being careful to bring everything I need to take it all at the right times: I will take something to help with the pain and the nausea when we start to drive, something else for the pain when we arrive, then something else for the nausea a few hours after that. Between medical cannabis and pepto bismol, the right foods and lots of rest, I am hoping really hard that it won’t be too miserable. Thankfully, I will be with friends who will understand if I can’t hang out with them that night.

I have scheduled my medical appointments around this trip. I was able to get a physical therapy appointment just a couple days after I return, so hopefully that will help with the pain from the long car ride and sleeping in a less-than-great bed.

My calendar is empty for the first 2 days after my return. That will give me time to rest and recover. I will get a lot of sleep, watch tv and movies, crochet, and read. If I feel up to it I will do more, and if not, that’s ok too. During my recovery time, I still need to eat, and I might not be up to preparing food, so I am making sure to cook and freeze food now that I can eat when I return.

I want to travel more. I really, desperately do. But then I remember what a trip like this is like. I can manage it ok, because it is only two days. I will leave at noon on Friday and be home by 5pm on Sunday at the latest. And I won’t be flying. I know it would be much harder if I was flying, for many reasons. It would be more painful. I might feel anxious at being “trapped” on a plan. Not to mention, I wouldn’t be able to bring any cannabis with me, and I can’t imagine how I would manage my symptoms without it.

At the same time, a friend and I are trying to schedule another weekend that I can visit her. The drive is less than 2 hours, but I would be driving myself. She would provide food I could eat during the entire visit, but aside from that, everything else would be the same. Resting for days in advance, blocking out days afterwards for rest, figuring out medications and other things to help alleviate my symptoms while knowing that I will almost definitely feel like shit the night that I arrive.

Sometimes it doesn’t seem worth it. But I know it will be in the end. Even thought it won’t be easy. It won’t be like it was before. But hopefully it will still be fun.


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