How my doctors’ office lost their phlebotomy lab

I emailed my doctor a reminder that I needed to have some blood tests repeated. When I first started going to that office, I lived less than a mile away. On days that I felt well enough, I walked there. Now I live a 30 minute drive from there, so it’s harder to get blood work done. That’s why I figured this was good timing; I had an appointment the next day with another practitioner in the office. I wasn’t prepared for my doctor’s response. It basically said, the order is in the system but they no longer have a phlebotomy lab, and it listed some other places I could get my blood draw.

WTF?

The next day, I saw the other practitioner and I asked about the loss of the phlebotomy lab. Was it temporary? Why on earth would a medical facility no longer have the ability to draw blood?

Her answer was simple and terrible: it was not considered cost effective by the hospital that was now in charge.

Several years ago, this independent facility became part of a local hospital system. This happens a lot in my area. For me this was good in some ways, because now they took my insurance, while they had not previously. On the other hand, the doctors lost some of their independence. Where before they referred patients to the best doctors they knew of, now there was pressure for all referrals to be within the hospital network. Not exactly putting patients first, were they?

This year, that hospital joined another hospital network. The hospitals are now separate, but connected. The new hospital network is bigger, though, and has more power. And the new network says that the phlebotomy lab is not cost effective. It’s not worth the money, even though it’s important for the care of the patients. How does that make sense? Isn’t the entire point of this building to provide care to patients? Apparently not.

My doctor had giving me a list of alternate places to get my blood drawn. Unfortunately, it was an additional two weeks before I was able to get to any of them. I have a car and am often mobile. Several years ago when I could barely leave the house more than two or three times each week, this would have cost me more. Some people don’t have cars, which will make many of these locations harder to access. For some, it will be impossible. What will happen to them? What will happen to all of us, as hospitals continue to make decisions that favor the bottom line over patients?

Because that wasn’t the only bad news. My practitioner also told me that the hospital is considering moving the entire staff of that building. The new location would be nearby, but due to traffic, it would be much harder for me to access. Due to less public transportation access, it would be impossible for others to access. The reason they are considering this is because it’s cheaper. The office has occupied this building for many years. However, it is now considered prime real estate, and the hospital would rather get more money by moving everyone. Maybe this will work out ok, but I do wonder what will happen to the many patients who rely on these excellent doctors and who can not get to the new place. Have they been taken into consideration at all?

This situation isn’t unique to this one office. We are seeing it more and more. There are cutbacks in all kinds of areas. What will be next? And what kind of impact will it have?

Have you experienced medical facilities prioritizing money over patients? Please share it in the comments.

7 Responses to How my doctors’ office lost their phlebotomy lab

  1. simplywendi says:

    I am sorry you are going through this. Although I have a hospital with a lab 5 minutes from my house, I have to go 45 min away to get blood work done. It is a difficult task to do as there are days I don’t feel well enough to drive that long.

    • chronicrants says:

      That sounds incredibly frustrating! I was once INSIDE a hospital and couldn’t get the bloodwork I needed because the doctor who could order it was with a different hospital, and I couldn’t get there before they closed. So even though I was inside a hospital when my symptoms hit, I had to wait until the next day to be tested. There’s something very wrong with these scenarios. I’m so sorry you’re put into such a difficult and health-harming position.

  2. Karen J says:

    I’m so sorry you keep running into “real life issues” because the system’s changing, for the sake of somebody’s bottom line!
    Hugs, anyway!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: